Sunday, July 05, 2015

Shattered Dreams by Jacqueline Baird

Shattered TrustShattered Trust by Jacqueline Baird

My rating: 4.25 of 5 stars


This was intense like I like my Harlequin Presents.  I honestly didn't like Nick at all initially. I totally thought the worst of him.  But then there would be moments where he looked so devastated and heartbroken.  I sort of guessed what his issue was partway into the book, and that he was trying to push Abby away.  I also felt he must be deeply in love with her and that's why he was trying to get them back together. It was heartbreaking to see Nick interact with the son he had rejected four years before.  But I could see why Abby didn't trust him and certainly didn't want to fall back in love with him, since it had cost her so much the first time around.  This book really makes you believe the hero was a cheater, but hang in there if you don't like cheating.  It all turns out well.

I liked that both lead characters are so three-dimensional.  You see all their traits, even the ones that aren't as pretty, such as Abby's jealousy of other women.  Although that is really understandable, considering the situation.  I like that Baird shows Nick at his worst, but allows the reader to gain the ability to think favorably about Nick and believe he loves his family and his wife.  He was a very tortured guy and that came across very clearly.  I think this is one of the HPs where you can feel just as strongly about the hero and the heroine.

Books like these are why I avidly reach for the older Harlequin Presents. They really bring the emotion and intensity for the reader. 

Overall rating: 4.25/5.0 stars.



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Saturday, July 04, 2015

Coraline by Neil Gaiman

CoralineCoraline by Neil Gaiman

My rating: 4.5 of 5 stars


"Coraline" continues my love affair with Neil Gaiman's books on audio. I love his voice so much. It's soothing but also keeps my mind focused on the story.  I think that he endows his words with all the emphasis, power and creative energy they should have.  He's really great with different voices as well. "Coraline" might be a short book on audio, but it's so rich and fulfilling.

I freely admit I had ghoulish tastes in books when I was a girl. I read every scary or dark fantasy novel in the children's section, and some multiple times (The Gruesome Green Witch I'm looking at you!).  I would have loved this book if it had been written when I was a young girl. It's nicely scary and intense, but also suitable for a child (and adults like me).  The "Other Mother" seethes with menace, and the use of subtle details (like her button eyes, penchant for eating beetles, and hair that waves as though a breeze is blowing although it isn't.)  There are even gruesome touches, such as the fact that some of the inhabitants of the world the "Other Mother" created are barely formed, gelatinous blobs.   I agree with another reviewer who said that they admired how brave Coraline was (and she's brave in the real sense, doing something in spite of her fears).  She's really an awesome young girl (but also realistic in her flaws).

I think that Gaiman has a sense of childhood that has not faded with his age. He understands the joy and the disappointments of it. Coraline is a young girl surrounded by adults, and that's a tough situation.  She seethes with physical and mental energy, and while appropriate in development for her age, she's also mature and capable of taking care of herself to a degree. But like any other child, she yearns for the love and attention of parents who care about her.  Luckily, she is able to see through the "Other Mother" and realizes that her parents are exactly what she needs and not a figment of her imagination with a menace beneath the wish fulfillment.

I would have to give this one 4.5 stars because it doesn't quite meet the high standards of The Graveyard Book in comparison. But it really is an outstanding book.  The movie is pretty good, if you get a chance to watch it.  I saw it first, and I plan to re-watch it and compare it since I watched it years ago and I'm just now reading the book.

If you can get this on audio, I highly recommend it.



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The Unleashing by Shelly Laurenston

The Unleashing (Call of Crows, #1)The Unleashing by Shelly Laurenston

My rating: 4 of 5 stars


This was a group read for the Dangerous Hero Addict Support Group, and I'm glad it got voted for.  It gave me that push to read Shelly Laurenston. I've heard from many that she's a good author, and I actually have most of her Dragon books written under G.A. Aiken, but I just hadn't gotten around to reading her books written under this name.

One thing that one needs to understand about this book is that it's very heroine and women-bonding centered.  Kera is a woman who needed strong bonds with women who had her back and who accepted her no matter what, and she found that with the Crows. At the same time, it's a romance, but the romance doesn't really develop until maybe 70 or so pages into the novel.  Having said that, I found this very enjoyable.  It's really funny and every character is a real 'character'.  There's even a dog that manages to steal some scenes.

I liked Vig, a lot.  He's a dangerous hero, but in a cuddly kind of way (when he's not in battle mode and ripping people's arms off.)  He's very supportive to Kera, and I'd call him the perfect boyfriend.  I would say the cover is highly misleading. I tried not to be embarrassed about it when I'd have it at work and my coworkers saw it.  Vig has a big beard and lots of hair. He's not a clean-shaven male model type.  I guess the publishers didn't think people would go for a cover with Vig as he looks in the book.  It seems to me that having big beards is very much in vogue, so I'd find that intriguing if the cover actually reflected that (not that like facial hair, because I don't). I like that Vig was comfortable with himself and thus with Kera as she was.  I think that's so crucial in a relationship that people accept you as you are.  They want the best for you, but they aren't constantly trying to change you.  The romance worked for me because it was built on mutual like and respect, as well as passion and strong emotion.

This book is pretty violent, with descriptive action scenes.  It wasn't over the top, and after reading Matt Reilly this past month, it seemed kind of mild, to be honest.  The story is about a violent subculture of fighters for the Norse gods who go all out.  I wasn't surprised for it to be violent with that expectation.  The story itself is intriguing and makes me want to keep reading this series.

So I really liked this one. I liked Kera a lot. She was a real person and I appreciated her strengths and weaknesses.  She was very caring, but tough as well.  I loved the multicultural feel to this book. There are people of just about every race and ethnicity.  And considering this is based on Norse mythology, it was cool that Laurenston was able to achieve this.  I also loved how the Crows are all strong women but not all cut from the same mode. I love when the diversity of strong women is presented instead of making it seem like all women have to be the same to be strong and confident.

There was a lot to appreciate about this book. Four well earned stars.



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Pulse of The Heartland by Melinda Cross

Pulse of the HeartlandPulse of the Heartland by Melinda Cross

My rating: 3.5 of 5 stars


I liked this, but at the same time, I didn't love the hero. He came off as a jerk from the beginning.  I don't mind a hero who torments the heroine (in a gentle way like the boy at school who teases the girl he likes), but his attitude of entitlement and his overweening arrogance killed it for me.  I almost felt like Nick was considered perfect with no faults, but Emily had to justify herself for her practices and beliefs because they were wrong.  I guess I felt like there was a sexist overtone to this book (and a little bit of the "traditional woman is the right kind of woman" vibe to this that irritated me).  I'm not saying that Emily couldn't use a different viewpoint, but how much did Nick try to understand her or show acceptance for who she was and why she lived life that way? Not much. From the beginning, Nick seemed like he was on a mission to change her or shake her up.  I think I might have felt somewhat better if Nick had ever said that he loved her or in his pursuing  of Emily, he showed more than purely lust or sexual attraction. It seemed like he was all about getting her into bed.

I wasn't very satisfied with the ending of this book.  It left a bad taste in my mouth because no words of love were said, and Emily was the one who was doing all the giving up and submitting (other than Nick staying in town).  While submitting isn't a bad word (depending on the root of the act), her submission didn't feel right to me.

I tend to over-think things and I know that I am thinking about this book from a personal vantage point because I do have issues with the perception of women in society and the persistent view that all women need to fit the same mode in relationship with men.   Marriages and relationships don't always have to follow the same model, but it seemed as though being with Nick had to be according to his terms, and that's always wrong to me.  I feel that love should be about mutual submission. I would have love to see Nick do some of the surrendering in this book. 

** Part of men thinks the nice brown eyed guy she danced with a lot at the block party might have been a good choice for Emily. I guess we'll never know.

It's not a badly written book at all. It's good, but the underlying message that came across didn't work for me.

Overall rating: 3.5/5.0 stars.



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Pulse of the Heartland by Melinda Cross

I liked this, but at the same time, I didn't love the hero. He came off as a jerk from the beginning.  I don't mind a hero who torments the heroine (in a gentle way like the boy at school who teases the girl he likes), but his attitude of entitlement and his overweening arrogance killed it for me.  I almost felt like Nick was considered perfect with no faults, but Emily had to justify herself for her practices and beliefs because they were wrong.  I guess I felt like there was a sexist overtone to this book (and a little bit of the "traditional woman is the right kind of woman" vibe to this that irritated me).  I'm not saying that Emily couldn't use a different viewpoint, but How much did Nick try to understand her or show acceptance for who she was and why she lived life that way. From the beginning, Nick seemed like he was on a mission to change her or shake her up.  I think I might have felt somewhat better if Nick had ever said that he loved her or did pursuing in a way that didn't seem purely lust or sexual.

I wasn't very satisfied with the ending of this book.  It left a bad taste in my mouth because no words of love were said, and Emily was the one who was giving up and submitting.  While submitting isn't a bad word (depending on the root of the act), her submission didn't feel right to me.

I tend to over-think things and I know that I am thinking about this book from a personal vantage point because I do have issues with the perception of women in society and the persistent view that all women need to fit the same mode in relationship with me.   Marriages and relationships don't always have to follow the same model, but it seemed as though being with Nick had to be according to his terms, and that's always wrong to me.  I feel that love should be about mutual submission. I would have love to see Nick do some of the surrendering in this book. 

** Part of thinks the nice brown eyed guy she danced with a lot at the block party might have been a good choice for Emily. I guess we'll never know.

It's not a badly written book at all. It's good, but the underlying message that came across didn't work for me.

Wednesday, July 01, 2015

House of Mystery, Vol.5: Under New Management by House of Mystery, Vol. 5: Under New Management by Matthew Sturges , Luca Rossi (Illustrator), José Marzán Jr. (Illustrator), Bill Willingham , Sergio Aragonés, Dave Justus, Paul Levitz, Alisa Kwitney, John Bolton (Illustrator), Farel Dalrymple (Illustrator), Sam Kieth (Illustrator)

House of Mystery, Vol. 5: Under New ManagementHouse of Mystery, Vol. 5: Under New Management by Matthew Sturges

My rating: 3 of 5 stars


I think I just need to hang up the towel and admit this series is not for me. It's gruesome and dark in a way that doesn't appeal to me.  The characters are either sadistic or they fall prey to other sadistic characters. I wouldn't say I'm too squeamish to enjoy any horror, but this kind of horror I don't like.  I was drawn in by the story within a story format and the idea of a house between dimensions. But those things don't overshadow the unappealing aspects for me. I feel the series really jumped the shark with one event.  I was like, seriously!  I did kind of like the cameo though.  I guess I'm going to have to say that this is the last volume I will read.  My sister is tough and I'll ask her to hold me accountable not to pick any of these up.  It's a shame. I want to know how things end.  I suppose I'll have to do what I did with the Under the Dome show. I had my sister keep me honest!  I stepped away and haven't looked back, other than drooling over pictures of Mike Vogel.  I don't think that there's a hot actor in this series to tempt me to reading more of this series.

Three stars because it's not really bad quality or poorly written. It's just not my taste.



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JLA: Earth 2 by Grant Morrison, Frank Quitely (Illustrator)

JLA: Earth 2JLA: Earth 2 by Grant Morrison

My rating: 3.5 of 5 stars


I can't get over how disturbing the evil twins of the Justice League are.  I mean just the Triad is bad enough.  Ultraman is a sleazy, psychopathic, cruel bully.  Owlman is like a demon-possessed Batman (or maybe if Batman was the Antichrist).  Superwoman is a little more developed in this than in Justice League, Vol. 5: Forever Heroes, and I what I know, I definitely don't like.  She's playing Owlman and Ultraman off each other, and I think she hates both of them (but feels more lust for Owlman).  She's sadistic and psychosexually deviant.  Yeah, it's just bad.  More disturbing is that Earth 3 is the opposite of Earth 2. Evil is the predominant value, given free reign.

I think that the science seems too implausible (or at least was so nebulously explained, I didn't believe it was plausible), and I didn't get how the day was saved in the end.  I feel that Crisis on Two Earths Justice League movie (which I suspect this is based on) explains the situation a lot better.  It's worth watching as an adjunct to this graphic novel. I re-watched it again last night and I liked the further insight into the characters.

It was pretty good, and kept my interest. Surprisingly adult and dark in content. It's kind of fun if you want to see the dark side of the triad of the Justice League and Lex Luthor as a good guy.

Overall rating: 3.5/5.0 stars.



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Monday, June 29, 2015

JSA, Vol. 4: Fair Play by Geoff Johns, Rags Morales (Illustrator), Stephen Sadowski (Illustrator)

JSA, Vol. 4: Fair PlayJSA, Vol. 4: Fair Play by Geoff Johns

My rating: 3 of 5 stars


My first official JSA graphic novel. I admit I avoided these for a while because I thought they were all set in the early 20th century, and I am turned off by that dated 50s morality feel.  However, I was pleasantly surprised to see that this takes place in the modern period, where time has passed, and only the long-lived (or immortal) JSA members are still active and alive in the organization. 

I was not blown away by this, but since I liked it more than I expected, I gave it three stars. They have some interesting team members with cool powers. It's surprisingly multicultural, which is a bonus. They take on some intense missions, and are actually kidnapped into Roulette's modern day gladiatorial games, which are highly lethal, to say the least.  I liked the character's ingenuity and use of their strengths and team work to get out of those situation. Loved the Batman cameo (big surprise).

I liked some characters more than others.   I didn't care for the young fellow whose name I forgot. He was a petulant brat.

Not a title I'd reach for first, but I'm willing to read more.



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A Deal Before the Altar by Rachael Thomas

A Deal Before the AltarA Deal Before the Altar by Rachael Thomas

My rating: 3 of 5 stars


I'm sad to say that this was a let down for me.  The blurb sounded really cool, since Marriage of Convenience books are my kryptonite.  And both of the characters are damaged souls (check).  Both have dysfunctional childhoods and parental failures in their background (makes for an interesting story and built in angst).  And both suffer from fear of emotional involvement (not my favorite, but I get it).  And yet, I couldn't get excited about this book.  I felt like I was thumbing through the pages and waiting for the spark. Even the love scenes were unexciting. Dare I say I was actually a bit bored?  I think that the ending bumped my rating up a little. It was sweet and dramatic in a way I like, and Georgina showed some chops. She's a heck of a woman.  I found her ability to play the game and be fearless in the face of other's negative opinions pretty impressive.  I found Santos less compelling.  I thought he was in a state of arrested development about his father's remarrying and having another child. I think Santos was lucky to have a woman like Georgina.  I think they loved each other, but I didn't feel much about it either way.

I would read more by this author, but I hope that she develops that ability to make her book sizzle and engender pathos in her reader.

Not bad enough for less than three stars, but too disaffecting for more than three.



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Friday, June 26, 2015

Flashpoint: The World of Flashpoint Featuring Batman by Brian Azzarello, J.T. Krul (Goodreads Author), Jimmy Palmiotti, Peter Milligan, Eduardo Risso (Illustrator), Mikel Janin (Illustrator), George Pérez (Illustrator), Fernando Blanco (Illustrator) , Scott Koblish (Illustrator), John Dell (Illustrator), Joe Bennett (Illustrator)

Flashpoint: The World of Flashpoint Featuring BatmanFlashpoint: The World of Flashpoint Featuring Batman by Brian Azzarello

My rating: 4 of 5 stars


This is even darker than the Flash volume!  Batman isn't the Batman we know and love. He's a much more driven, more morally compromised version.  What would happen if a man's child was killed in front of him and he was powerless to prevent it.  The Joker is probably even more twisted, and you wouldn't believe me if I told you.  That's just the Batman story.

Then there's the story about the biggest jerk in the DC-Verse, Deathstroke, and his crusade to find his lost daughter.  I can't call him a hero, because he's not. He's ruthlessly selfish and murderous.  I feel bad for anyone who throws in with him. He's not a man I'd trust as far as I could throw him.  This is non-stop action, a world in which the seas have become a lawless place of pirates, and the Atlanteans kill humans with impunity.

The story about Dick Grayson and his family tells us how things might have gone if Bruce Wayne had not been there in his life after the death of his parents. Also shows a Europe that has been decimated by the Atlantean-Amazonean war, and where various DC-verse figures have become freedom fighters (even ones who were once villains).

My least favorite was Secret Seven. It was pretty gruesome and twisted, and while I see the point of it all in terms of the Flashpoint story arc, I didn't really appreciate the story at all.

I would still give this four stars because I thought it was pretty interesting, and frankly, nightmarish.



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Thursday, June 25, 2015

Flashpoint: The World of Flashpoint Featuring The Flash by Sean Ryan, José Marzán Jr. (Illustrator), Sterling Gates (Goodreads Author), Adam Glass, Scott Kolins (Writer/Illustrator), Ig Guara (Illustrator), Oliver Nome (Illustrator), Rodney Buchemi (Illustrator) , Joel Gomez (Illustrator)

Flashpoint: The World of Flashpoint Featuring The FlashFlashpoint: The World of Flashpoint Featuring The Flash by Sean Ryan

My rating: 4 of 5 stars


I will confess I watched "The Flashpoint Paradox" Justice League movie prior to reading this, and let me tell you, I was blown away at how dark this story arc is.  This is like "What If?" on steroids.

The movie goes into some explanations I won't get into, and I tried to forget I knew that, because I haven't read The Flash, Vol. 2: The Road to Flashpoint yet, which I think is probably the backstory.  All I know is, I don't want this life for any of the DC characters I know and love.    One of the interesting things is seeing what this crazy world does to the various characters as you know them.  Villains end up on the other side.  Sometimes, they stay just as villainous. Sometimes, they are worse, unchecked in a world where the Justice League as we know it never existed or has fallen by the wayside.  Where Wonder Woman has become an autocrat who leads ruthless, murderous Amazons who delight in killing humans. 

This one isn't for the kiddos. Very violent and has some disturbing imagery.  Probably the most disturbing in the story about Gorilla Grodd, who has pretty much taken Africa and claimed it for his own, and it ain't pretty.  I couldn't look away.  I'm starting to wonder why AU seems to be so dark and dreary. Maybe so that the reader will repeat, "It's only a book. It's only a book. It's only a book," and wipe their foreheads.  While the first story is about Flash, this is really more like an anthology featuring different characters from the DC verse in the aftermath of Flashpoint.

Flash is a cool character. I like him more all the time.  Interesting that this is my first official solo Flash graphic novel. I'll be reading more.



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The Maltese Falcon by Dashiell Hammett

The Maltese Falcon The Maltese Falcon by Dashiell Hammett

My rating: 4 of 5 stars


Sam Spade is a street-smart protagonist with a nose for solving crimes and an eye for the ladies, but nothing touches his heart of stone.  Not even the quest for a black statue of a falcon that is a priceless treasure, and the beautiful damsel in distress it brings into his life.

What starts as a simple surveillance job becomes a mystery that leads to some dead bodies, that the police are eager to pin on Spade.  Spade isn't the man to be played, and he shows his ruthless nature, and keen intelligence hiding under a deceptive facade.

I listened to this on audio, narrated by William Dufris. He does an excellent job and really seems to enjoy himself in the process.  Unlike some narrators, he manages a very good female voice that doesn't remind me of a man in drag.  He also makes each character sound distinctive, and the nature of those characters oozes out to the listener.

I personally found Spade to be a jerk. But he's not all bad. He is adept that saying what a woman wants to hear, and with casual endearments delivered in a silver tongue, but meaning none of it, but he can also be quite mean to the women in his life.  I wouldn't exactly call him a thug, but he has no problem using his physicality as an asset when it's necessary.  The fact that he's a good detective is very apparent.  And strangely enough, deep down there is a strange sense of honor that won't allow him to look the other way, even when he longs to.  He also seems to be motivated by a need for no one to think they can take advantage of him.  He's even willing to allow people to think the worst of him so long as he can keep his tough guy reputation.  You get the impression that San Francisco is his city, and he knows how to maneuver his way through its deep waters.  He is a true detective in the sense that nothing gets past him, and while he sometimes struggles to control his emotions, he never allows them to compromise his intellect. 

Bridget O'Shaugnessey is one of those heroines who seems helpless and sweet, but it's also apparent she is more than capable of taking care of herself, like butter wouldn't melt in her mouth.  The fact that she's deeply involved in this falcon affair is a big sign that she's no Pollyanna.  While part of you really wants to like her and fall into her honeytrap, the other part knows that she's not exactly what she seems.  I didn't blame Spade for being wary of her and not believing any word she says.

Gutman and Cairo are conveyed in such a way that it's impossible to think of them as caricatures.  Their descriptions are so distinctive, almost misleading. However, as I kept reading, I realized that their menace lurks under the surface. Wilbur is truly a scary character, a young psychopath capable of extreme violence and kept on a very short leash. While Wilbur is like a trigger, I'd rather know who my enemy is instead of being faced with an amiable man who is all smiles while he's plotting my demise, like Gutman. Or squishy dandy who seems like he'd jump if you shooed a fly.

I was a bit surprised at the raw content in this novel.  Plenty of swearing, although not the big swear words that slip so casually off the tongue nowadays in media. While the sexual elements are alluded to, there is no question that something is going on between the sheets, and that Spade has a certain reputation. 

Hammett's writing is terse and tends to be heavy on dialogue, using it as a tool to reveal crucial information about its character.  His imagery is clear and bold.  While some of his adjectives are a bit clunky, I really enjoyed the auditory stimulus of his descriptors.  He conveys Spade as a very physical man, but that is merely a smokescreen for his keen intelligence, and one of his best assets, the ability to cause his enemies to underestimate him.

I think that there is a lot to learn about writing detective fiction from this book.  Hammett makes it look easy, but it's not.   Less is more is a lot harder than it seems, and my favorite authors are those who get it right. I recommend listening to this.  It's very easy on the ears.



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Daredevil: The Devil's Hand by Andy Diggle, Roberto de la Torre

Daredevil: The Devil's HandDaredevil: The Devil's Hand by Andy Diggle

My rating: 4.5 of 5 stars


Wow, this is the really real. To think that Daredevil agrees to lead the Hand.  Things must be pretty dire for Daredevil to get in bed with the enemy.  Well things are.  Hell's Kitchen is looking a lot like the real thing, and Murdock realizes that conventional methods of obtaining justice are doomed to fail.  He's willing to take extreme measures, but like Frank Sinatra, he's going to do it "My Way."  Beware of best laid plans, Matt.

This was a really good graphic novel.  It was very intense, and the artwork was fantastic.  The artist has managed to use color and shade to convey the grim world of Daredevil.  There are some scenes that feel very grand, with Daredevil, and the Hand bowing at his feet.  The action sequences are awesome and fluid.  I can't say enough about how much I liked the artwork.

The writing is equally strong.  I think that anything with ninjas and katana makes me heart sings, and I feel that the writer I think this is very near to being a five star book. The story had me on the edge of my seat, and while Daredevil can more than take care of himself, he's deep in the lion's den and his enemies are many and employ any tactics necessary to destroy him, those he loves, and seek to dominate and conquer by any means necessary.  The tension is off the charts, and I hope that my library has the next volume.

I think if I wasn't being so stingy with fives it would be.  It's darn near close.

Overall rating: 4.5/5.0 stars.



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Sunday, June 21, 2015

Free Agent by JC Nelson

Free Agent (Grimm Agency, #1)Free Agent by J.C. Nelson

My rating: 4.5 of 5 stars


I really enjoyed this book.  I picked it up because I just plain love fairy tales, and it sounded interesting, with a heroine who is basically a debt slave to her Fairy Godfather.   I absolutely love urban fantasy, and it's great when you find one that hits on your happy buttons.  This book does it for me.

One thing I will say is the author has a weird/morbid sense of humor. He talks freely about feeding poodles to hellhounds and running over gnomes, and this might be a turnoff to some readers.  Once I got used to that, it didn't bother me as much.  I think the worldbuilding was good.  Set in New York, but the magical Kingdom is adjacent, and can only be reached by some with a magical tie.

Marissa is a cool character. She's tough as nails but also vulnerable in other ways. She reflects the psyche of the average twentysomething person:  trying to figure out who they are and what they are doing, and what they want to do with their lives?  Marissa has had it tough because her destiny wasn't exactly her own.  Her only goal was working off her debt and getting back to her family. It's absolutely heartbreaking when she realizes the truth about her family.  However, Marissa's feels very much like a fairy tale heroine.  I like that Marissa's angst becomes her strength.  While Grimm is her boss, I think their relationship is very complex. I would say that Grimm is almost like the father that Marissa craves.  While her family seemed to throw her away, Grimm has given her another family and taken pretty good care of her, considering.

The romance was very cute.  Nelson plants some seeds but never gives the whole story away, so one is likely to ask why Marissa thought this person was the target.  I liked Liam a lot and I hope he sticks around.  His curse is kinda sucky for him, but cool from an urban fantasy perspective.  Ari is fun as well.  A very unprincess-like princess who plays a huge role in this story.

The reviews aren't great for this, but I give it a strong thumbs up.  The author knows his fairy tales and takes the reader along for a ride that is in parts funny, sad, scary, creepy, and feels unique even with some elements that make it fit well within the urban fantasy genre. Some aspects were a bit confusing, but it wasn't a deal breaker for me.  Overall, I found this thoroughly enjoyable and I devoured it in about 36 hours.

Overall rating: 4.5/5.0 stars.

Casting Ideas:

Chloe Bennett as Marissa



Miles Teller as Liam









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